Suboxone is an opioid medication used to treat opiate addiction, specifically by blocking the effects of heroin or other opiate drugs. It also functions as a narcotic in and of itself, which means it can be abused just like any other opioid drug.

If you take suboxone with alcohol, will it block the effects of the alcohol? Or will you get drunk faster? Are there any risks associated with combining these two drugs? The answer to all of these questions may surprise you.

Let’s take a look at some facts about mixing suboxone and alcohol so that you can make an educated decision about your own use.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a synthetic opioid drug prescribed to treat opiate abuse and dependency. It works by taking the place of other opiates in the brain and blocking the effects of heroin or other opiates; it completely blocks the effects of other drugs.

Suboxone is unique in that it is a combination of two drugs. Buprenorphine is the main opioid drug in Suboxone and naloxone is an opioid antagonist (which means it blocks the effects of other opioids). The naloxone in Suboxone is there as a safeguard against potential abuse of the drug. If Suboxone is crushed and injected, the naloxone will completely block the opiate effects of the Buprenorphine.

The Addictive Properties of Suboxone

Like all opioid drugs, Suboxone can be addictive. However, this depend largely on the dosage. If you are taking a small dose of Suboxone to treat opiate dependency, there is a low risk of addiction. If you are taking a high dose to get high, there is a higher risk of addiction.

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Suboxone is a Schedule II narcotic, meaning it has a high potential for abuse.

Consequently, it is important to wean yourself off Suboxone rather than trying to stop taking it abruptly. If you are taking a high dose of Suboxone for recreational use, it is possible to become addicted. If you are taking Suboxone for a legitimate medical reason, you can still become addicted to the drug.

Will Suboxone block the effects of Alcohol?

We’ve seen above that Suboxone is an opioid drug with the potential for abuse. Alcohol is also an opioid drug, albeit a different kind. As a result, the effects of these drugs will overlap and, in some cases, diminish the effects of the other.

Suboxone is an opioid agonist; it activates opioid receptors in the brain. So when you take Suboxone and drink alcohol, the alcohol also activates opioid receptors in the brain. Thus, the two drugs are competing for the same receptors. Consequently, the effects of one may be diminished by the other.

This theory is not proven and there is little research on the subject. However, it is a reasonable hypothesis based on what we know about the effects of these drugs. Suboxone is an opioid, alcohol is an opioid; therefore, these drugs will have an overlapping effect.

Risks Associated with Mixing Suboxone and Alcohol


There are potential risks associated with mixing alcohol and Suboxone. The effects of one may diminish the effects of the other. Suboxone may block the effects of alcohol and alcohol may block the effects of Suboxone. In either case, you will be left with a high level of one or both drugs in your blood.

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You may experience a blackout or loss of consciousness due to a high level of alcohol in your blood. Alternatively, you may experience a black box warning due to a high level of Suboxone in your blood. While there are no immediate risks associated with mixing alcohol and Suboxone, it is important to be careful.

You may drink more alcohol than intended. You may experience a blackout due to a high level of alcohol in your blood. You may experience an overdose due to a high level of Suboxone in your blood.

Conclusion

Suboxone is an opioid drug that can be abused for recreational purposes. Alcohol is also an opioid drug that can be abused for recreational purposes. Therefore, the two drugs have an overlapping effect. The effects of one may diminish the other.

Both drugs can be abused or used inappropriately. If you take Suboxone with alcohol, the effects of the alcohol may be diminished by the Suboxone. Similarly, the effects of the Suboxone may be diminished by the alcohol.

The effects of one or both drugs may be increased due to a high level of one or both drugs in your blood. It is important to be careful when mixing alcohol and Suboxone.


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