Suboxone is a brand name for Buprenorphine and Naloxone in one package. It’s an opiate medication used to treat opioid dependence, usually in conjunction with other addiction treatment methods such as therapy and group support groups.

It is not an opioid itself but rather an antagonist that blocks opiate receptors thereby reducing the ability of opioids to induce reward, block pain and induce a high.

Here we’ll take a look at how Suboxone can help reverse opioid addiction, what the side effects are, who it’s best suited for and where you can get it if you think you might be interested in trying it out.

What Is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a branded name for one of the medications used to treat opioid dependence. It contains Buprenorphine, an opiate medication that blocks the ability of other opioids to induce reward, pain relief or a high. It also contains Naloxone, a medication that blocks euphoria. Together, these two medications allow partial opioid dependence without the ability to get a high from them.

This allows a patient to taper off their other opioid dependence without experiencing severe withdrawal.

How Does Suboxone Help With Opioid Dependence?

Suboxone acts by blocking the action of other opioids in the brain. This stops the normal rewarding effects of other opioids like heroin, but also blocks their ability to induce pain relief or get you high. Thus, it is not a perfect solution, but it allows someone who is addicted to opiates to get off of them with reduced risk of suffering severe withdrawal symptoms.

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For example, if you take heroin and then take Suboxone, you won’t feel any of the rewarding effects of the heroin. You also won’t have any of the negative effects of the heroin like the inability to stop yourself from overdosing.

Suboxone is not a single-dose wonder drug. It takes time to work, and it takes even more time to help someone wean off of their other opiate dependence. Because of this, many doctors recommend that you not attempt to treat your own opioid dependence with Suboxone without consulting with a doctor first.

Who Can Benefit From Suboxone?

Suboxone is a useful medication for those who are treating an opioid addiction. People with substance use disorders can benefit from Suboxone because it reduces the risk of an overdose and provides a way to taper off other opioids with less severe withdrawal symptoms.

People with a Suboxone prescription are generally those who are not ready for drug rehabilitation but want to reduce their dependence on opioids.

People who can benefit from Suboxone may have recently been in an opioid detox, recently stopped taking other opioids like heroin or are generally not ready for drug rehabilitation.

People who have recently been in an opioid detox may have severe withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone can help to ease this while they live through withdrawal and while they search for other sources of support.

People who have recently stopped taking other opioids like heroin may still have high levels of the opioids in their system and may not have the ability to withstand severe withdrawal symptoms.

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Lastly, people who are not ready for drug rehabilitation may have trouble committing to a full rehabilitation program. They may not be ready to admit to themselves or others that they have a problem, or they may not have the financial resources to go through rehab.

Side Effects of Suboxone

While Suboxone is generally safe and effective, it is important to go through withdrawal under the supervision of a doctor. Some of the mild side effects of Suboxone include constipation, nausea, vomiting, headaches, drowsiness, and irritability.

Some of the serious side effects of Suboxone include low blood pressure, respiratory problems, heart rhythm problems, and allergic reactions.

Where To Find Help With Suboxone And Drug Rehabilitation


If you are looking for help with an opioid dependence and want to try Suboxone, it is important to go through withdrawal under the supervision of a doctor. It is also important to see a therapist regularly and engage in support groups such as Narcotics Anonymous or SMART Recovery.

If you are ready for drug rehabilitation, you can find inpatient, outpatient or residential drug rehab facilities near you through our treatment search.

You may also want to look into local support groups or forums that specialize in helping those with opioid dependencies. These can be a useful resource for those who are not ready for Drug Rehab but are still trying to taper off their drug dependence.

Final Words

Suboxone is a medication that can be used to treat opioid dependence. It is not a single-dose wonder drug, and it takes time to work. It also takes time to taper off other opioids with less severe withdrawal symptoms.

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Suboxone works by blocking the action of other opioids in the brain. This stops the normal rewarding effects of other opioids like heroin, but also blocks their ability to induce pain relief or get you high.

Suboxone can be used to treat opioid dependence and can be helpful to those who are not ready for drug rehabilitation or who recently went through opioid detox but still have severe withdrawal symptoms.


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The wealthformyhealth.com team is composed of doctors and few students in their final year of medicine who have decided to popularize and share their knowledge.