Suboxone is a medication that’s used to treat people who are addicted to opiate-based drugs such as heroin, morphine, or codeine. It’s a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, which work together to reduce cravings while simultaneously blocking the effects of opiate-based drugs.

Suboxone can help those who are struggling with an opioid addiction get their life back on track by reducing their cravings for substances and allowing them to function in everyday life without feeling like they need more of the drug to feel normal again.

The medication does not make someone feel high or intoxicated in any way; instead, it simply blocks the effects of other opioids, preventing you from being ableTo abuse them again in the future.

How long does Suboxone take to kick in?

When you take Suboxone, it’ll take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours to kick in. The exact time it takes Suboxone to kick in will vary from person to person, depending on a few different factors. These include your metabolism, your weight, and the amount of food in your stomach.

Suboxone will reach its maximum effect after about 4 hours after you take the medication. After that point, it will stay at the same level for about 12 hours before slowly wearing off.

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The effects of Suboxone can last for up to 24 hours, so it’s important to take this medication at the same time each day so you don’t miss a dose.

What happens when you take Suboxone?

Suboxone works by binding to the opioid receptors in your brain and body, blocking the effects of opiates such as heroin and other painkillers. When someone takes these types of drugs, they cause their brain’s reward system to release a chemical called dopamine.

Over time, the brain begins to crave this dopamine release, causing a person to feel like they need the drug to function.

When you take Suboxone, it binds to the same opioid receptors in the brain, but it doesn’t cause the same dopamine release. Instead, it blocks other opioid drugs from binding to the receptors, preventing them from causing the dopamine release the brain craves.

Taking Suboxone essentially tricks your brain into thinking it has binding to opioid drugs, but it actually doesn’t cause the high associated with them.

How long does it take for Suboxone to work?

Suboxone works by blocking the effects of other opioids, so it doesn’t really take an “effect”. You simply take the medication as directed, and it blocks any other opioids from affecting your brain and body.

Because of how it works, you don’t have to wait for Suboxone to kick in to experience benefits. In fact, you’ll notice the effects right away, as soon as you take the medication.

Side effects of taking suboxone

Like any other medication, suboxone is associated with some side effects. The most common ones include feeling drowsy, lightheaded, or having trouble sleeping.

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While all medications have side effects, suboxone withdrawal is much safer than withdrawal from other types of opiates.

If you’re taking suboxone as directed, it will block the effects of any other opiates in your system, preventing you from experiencing the negative effects of withdrawal.

That being said, you should be careful not to stop taking suboxone too soon. Stopping the medication before your doctor says is actually dangerous and can cause serious withdrawal symptoms.

How to tell if Suboxone is working?

If you’re wondering if Suboxone is working for you, there are a few signs to look out for.

One of the most obvious signs the medication is working is if it’s helping you regain a healthy weight.

When someone takes opioids, it causes their body to stop producing endorphin. These are natural chemicals in the body that play a crucial role in maintaining a healthy weight and metabolism.

When you stop taking Suboxone, it doesn’t cause your body to stop producing endorphin, so you can continue to eat well and stay at a healthy weight.

You may also notice that you’re sleeping better and experiencing decreased anxiety.
Another sign the medication is working is if you no longer feel the cravings for other opioids.

If you’re taking Suboxone as directed and it’s blocking the effects of any other opiates in your system, you won’t feel like you need something else to get through the day.

Taking suboxone with other medications


If you’re taking any other medications in addition to Suboxone, you should check the drug facts to see if there are any interactions.

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Some common drugs that may interact with Suboxone include blood thinners, anti-depressants, or certain antibiotics.

While Suboxone is a relatively safe medication, taking it along with other medications is never recommended.

If you’re taking one of these medications, talk to your doctor before starting Suboxone. They can let you know if the medications will interact and what you can do to avoid problems.

Conclusions

Suboxone is a medication that’s used to help people with an opioid addiction get clean. When someone takes Suboxone, it blocks the effects of other opioids, helping them stay drug-free.

The drug works by binding to opioid receptors in the brain and body, preventing other opioids from affecting the brain.

When you take Suboxone, you’ll notice the effects right away. Suboxone works by blocking the effects of other opioids, so it doesn’t really take an effect. You simply take the medication as directed, and it blocks any other opioids from affecting your brain and body.

If you or someone you love is struggling with an opioid addiction, Suboxone may be a good option for treatment. Make sure to speak with a doctor before beginning treatment to discuss the risks and benefits of the medication.


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The wealthformyhealth.com team is composed of doctors and few students in their final year of medicine who have decided to popularize and share their knowledge.