Methadone and buprenorphine are both drugs commonly used to treat opioid addiction. These two medications have different mechanisms of action, and they also leave the user with a different set of adverse effects that can make it challenging to switch from one to the other.

However, both methadone and Suboxone are part of standard opioid addiction treatment, so switching from one to the other is something that many people in recovery will need to do at some point.

This article will explain how long it takes to switch from methadone to suboxone, including how long you should wait before switching and what you should know when switching. Keep reading to learn more.

How Long to Switch from Methadone to Suboxone?

Depending on the person, switching from methadone to suboxone can take between 1 and 15 days. Methadone is a long-acting opioid, which means that it stays in your system for a long time.

In contrast, Suboxone is a short-acting opioid, which means that it leaves your system quickly. This difference in the length of time that these two drugs are active in the body means that you have to wait a different amount of time before switching from one to the other.

If you are switching from methadone to suboxone, you will likely have to wait 1-2 weeks before you can start your suboxone treatment.

See also  How Long Does Methadone Stay In Your System And Urine [LAST STUDY]

This is because it takes that long for the methadone to leave your system. If you take methadone as prescribed, it will take a little less time to leave your system. Depending on your situation, the wait might be even shorter.

If you are switching from suboxone to methadone, you will have to wait a longer time – between 1 and 2 weeks. It might take longer if you are weaning off suboxone slowly or as part of a treatment plan.

Why Switch from Methadone to Suboxone?

If you are switching from methadone to suboxone, there might be a few reasons why you’re making the switch. You might be switching because:

  • The dose you’re on isn’t working: Some people experience a bad reaction to the dose of methadone they’re prescribed. If this is the case, you might want to switch to suboxone as a way of getting better results.
  • You want to taper down: Some people might be on a high dose of methadone when they start their suboxone treatment. If this is the case, they might want to switch to suboxone as a way of tapering down.
  • You experienced side effects while on methadone: Some people experience a bad reaction to the side effects of methadone. If this is the case, you might want to switch to suboxone as a way of getting better results.
  • You want to add a medication to your treatment: Some people might choose to switch from methadone to suboxone as a way of adding a medication to their treatment.

When Should You Switch From Methadone to Suboxone?

You should only switch from methadone to suboxone after you’ve been on methadone for at least a week. This is because the length of time that methadone stays in your system is shorter than the length of time that suboxone stays in your system.

See also  Can I Take Suboxone 24 Hours after Methadone?

You should wait a week for two reasons. First, you should give yourself enough time to get through the withdrawal symptoms that come with starting methadone. Second, you should make sure that the methadone is out of your system before you start your suboxone treatment.

What You Should Know When Switching From Methadone to Suboxone?


Both methadone and suboxone are part of standard opioid addiction treatment, which means that switching from one to the other is something that many people in recovery will have to do at some point. If you’re switching from methadone to suboxone, there are a few things that you should know.

  • The dose of methadone and suboxone might be different: The dose of methadone and suboxone might be different, which means that you might have to adjust your dosage slightly when switching from one to the other.
  • You might experience withdrawal symptoms: If you wait long enough to switch from methadone to suboxone, you might experience withdrawal symptoms. If this is the case, you should talk to your doctor about ways to manage these symptoms.
  • You might have to take the suboxone differently: The way that you take suboxone might be different than the way that you take methadone. If this is the case, you should talk to your doctor about how to take the suboxone correctly.

Bottomline

Methadone and suboxone are both drugs commonly used to treat opioid addiction. These two medications have different mechanisms of action, and they also leave the user with a different set of adverse effects that can make it challenging to switch from one to the other.

See also  Why Are My Suboxone Levels Low?

However, both methadone and Suboxone are part of standard opioid addiction treatment, so switching from one to the other is something that many people in recovery will need to do at some point.

This is because it takes that long for the methadone to leave your system. If you take methadone as prescribed, it will take a little less time to leave your system. Depending on your situation, the wait might be even shorter.


The Team
Author

The wealthformyhealth.com team is composed of doctors and few students in their final year of medicine who have decided to popularize and share their knowledge.