Suboxone is a medication that helps people recover from opioid addiction. It’s an FDA-approved drug that is considered safe if used as directed by your doctor and much safer than opioids, which are very addictive and dangerous drugs.

However, like any other medication, it does have side effects. You will know whether you can take Suboxone or not after reading this article. Keep reading to know everything about suboxone side effects and risks, how it works, the benefits of taking suboxone, how suboxone works to wean you away from all other opioids, and more.

What are the long term effects of taking Suboxone?

We don’t exactly know what the long-term effects of taking Suboxone are. But we do know that like any other form of medication, it can have some side effects.

  • Neurological: Taking Suboxone over a long period of time can cause neurological side effects like drowsiness, dizziness, headaches, and numbness in the extremities. It can also make you groggy and have trouble focusing, which can affect your ability to work.
  • Respiratory: This is an often-overlooked side effect of taking Suboxone. It is recommended that people with respiratory disorders such as asthma and COPD not take this medication. Breathing problems are a serious side effect of Suboxone. It can even cause death in people with serious respiratory issues.
  • Gastrointestinal: This is another common side effect of taking Suboxone. It can cause nausea, vomiting, constipation, and abdominal cramps.
  • Heart and blood pressure: Taking Suboxone for a long time can cause high blood pressure and heart palpitations. It can also affect your heartbeat.
  • Sexual health: Another serious side effect of taking Suboxone is erectile dysfunction. It can also cause low libido and trouble with orgasms.
  • Endocrine: Taking Suboxone can cause hormonal changes and make your thyroid glands work less efficiently.
  • Metabolic: Taking Suboxone can cause metabolic changes and make you gain a significant amount of weight.
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How does Suboxone work?

Suboxone is a combination of two drugs – Buprenorphine and Naloxone.

  • Buprenorphine: This is the opioid agonist in Suboxone. It binds to opioid receptors in the brain and treats opioid withdrawal symptoms. It also helps prevent you from getting hooked on opioids again.
  • Naloxone: This is an opioid antagonist that is added to Suboxone to prevent misuse and abuse. It cancels out the effects of Buprenorphine, making it ineffective.
  • Suboxone: Buprenorphine and Naloxone are mixed together when Suboxone is created. They come in the form of a film strip that dissolves under your tongue.
  • Suboxone Film: Suboxone film is a form of Suboxone that contains less Naloxone. It is dissolved under your tongue.

Why take Suboxone to recover from opioid addiction?

Suboxone is a safe and effective medication that can help you recover from opioid addiction. It can be used as a maintenance medication to help you overcome your opioid dependency and stay off drugs for good.

Suboxone allows you to experience the positive effects of opioids without the risk of addiction. It helps you withdraw from painkillers or heroin without suffering from extreme withdrawal symptoms. It also helps prevent you from getting hooked on opioids again.

Suboxone can help you get on a path to recovery and live a drug-free life. It is FDA-approved and safe to use for treating opioid addiction.

Side effects of taking Suboxone

The side effects of taking Suboxone are mild, occur in a small percentage of people, and are generally short-lived. They can be reduced or prevented by taking Suboxone as prescribed by your doctor.

  • Neurological: Taking Suboxone over a long period of time can cause neurological side effects like drowsiness, dizziness, headaches, and numbness in the extremities. It can also make you groggy and have trouble focusing, which can affect your ability to work.
  • Respiratory: This is an often-overlooked side effect of taking Suboxone. It is recommended that people with respiratory disorders such as asthma and COPD not take this medication. Breathing problems are a serious side effect of Suboxone. It can even cause death in people with serious respiratory issues.
  • Gastrointestinal: This is another common side effect of taking Suboxone. It can cause nausea, vomiting, constipation, and abdominal cramps.
  • Heart and blood pressure: Taking Suboxone for a long time can cause high blood pressure and heart palpitations. It can also affect your heartbeat.
  • Sexual health: Another serious side effect of taking Suboxone is erectile dysfunction. It can also cause low libido and trouble with orgasms.
  • Endocrine: Taking Suboxone can cause hormonal changes and make your thyroid glands work less efficiently.
  • Metabolic: Taking Suboxone can cause metabolic changes and make you gain a significant amount of weight.
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The risks of taking Suboxone

Like any other form of medication, Suboxone also comes with a few risks. It’s important to discuss the risks with your doctor so you can be prepared in case they happen.

  • Hepatitis: Suboxone contains Naloxone, an opioid antagonist. It is added to Suboxone to prevent misuse and abuse. However, Naloxone can cause injury to the liver in people with a history of drug abuse.
  • Cardiovascular risks: Taking Suboxone for a long time can cause high blood pressure and heart palpitations. It can also affect your heartbeat.
  • Risk of overdose: When you take a high dose of Suboxone, you can get a dangerously high level of Buprenorphine. This can lead to an overdose.

Can you stop taking suboxone?


Yes, you can stop taking Suboxone at any time. This can be done by tapering down your dosage. But you should do it under the supervision of your doctor so you don’t experience severe withdrawal symptoms.

It’s important to get off Suboxone as soon as you are completely off opioids. If you stop taking Suboxone while still on opioids, you can experience extremely severe withdrawal symptoms. This can be fatal in some cases.

If you want to get off Suboxone, you must taper down your dosage under the supervision of a doctor. You must also be completely off opioids to safely get off Suboxone.

Conclusion

Suboxone can help you recover from opioid addiction by easing withdrawal symptoms and preventing you from getting hooked on opioids again. It is a safe and effective medication that is FDA-approved.

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Like any other form of medication, Suboxone also comes with a few risks. It’s important to discuss the risks with your doctor so you can be prepared in case they happen. It’s important to seek help if you are hooked on opioids or have opioid abuse disorder.

The most important thing you can do is to reach out for help. There are many treatment options available to help you overcome your addiction. With the help of a doctor, you can find the treatment that works best for you.


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The wealthformyhealth.com team is composed of doctors and few students in their final year of medicine who have decided to popularize and share their knowledge.