Does xanax cause water retention? That is a question many users ask themselves. How much water you retain while taking the drug depends on various factors like your body type, how frequently you take it, and if you drink water while taking it.

While it’s uncommon to see water retention as a side effect of Xanax, there are certain circumstances in which this can occur.

Read on to learn more about whether or not Xanax causes water retention and what you can do if it happens to you.

What does Xanax do to your body?

Xanax is a benzodiazepine, which means it’s a type of drug that acts as a central nervous system depressant. That is, it induces a state of calm and relaxation in your body by decreasing your levels of stress and anxiety.

Xanax is most often prescribed for the treatment of anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and panic disorders. It’s also sometimes prescribed for patients who are struggling with drug or alcohol dependence.

Xanax can cause side effects in some people, including those who are taking it for anxiety and panic disorders. For some people, one of the most common side effects of Xanax is water retention. This can happen for a variety of reasons.

Xanax and water retention: A brief overview

Let’s take a closer look at what happens to your body when you take Xanax. When you ingest the drug, it’s metabolized by your liver and ends up being distributed throughout your body.

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It has a very short half-life, which is the amount of time it takes your body to break down and eliminate the drug from your system.

That’s why you need to take it several times a day to keep the same level of calm it provides over the course of a day.

How much water do you retain while taking Xanax?

When your body retains water, it means that it’s holding onto extra fluid. This can happen for a variety of reasons and is not always a sign of a serious medical problem. It can also happen while you’re taking Xanax.

How much water you retain while taking Xanax will depend on a number of different factors. One of the main factors that determine how much water you retain while taking Xanax is your body type.

People with a higher body fat percentage are more likely to retain extra water than people with a lower percentage of body fat. The more body fat you have, the more water you’ll retain.

When is Xanax most likely to cause water retention?

If you’re taking Xanax for anxiety or panic disorders, you might notice that you’re retaining water. This is not a common side effect, though, and only occurs in a small percentage of people who take it.

You’re most likely to see water retention as a side effect of Xanax if your body fat percentage is high and you take a large dose of the drug every day. You’re also more likely to retain water if you drink a lot of water while taking Xanax.

Other factors that may cause water retention while taking Xanax


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As we mentioned above, the main factor that determines how much water you retain while taking Xanax is your body type.

However, there are other factors that might affect how much water you retain, including:

  • Your age: Younger people are more likely to retain water than older people.
  • Your gender: Men are more likely to retain water while taking Xanax than women.
  • Your ethnicity: People of Asian descent are less likely to retain water while taking Xanax than people of other ethnicities.
  • Your diet: Diets high in salt are more likely to contribute to fluid retention than diets low in salt.
  • Your activity level: People who are more physically active are less likely to retain water while taking Xanax than those who are less active.
  • Your stress levels: People under a lot of stress are more likely to retain water while taking Xanax than people with lower levels of stress.

Summary

Does Xanax cause water retention?

Yes, if you take a high dose of the drug, have a high body fat percentage, and/or drink a lot of water while taking it. Other factors that may cause water retention while taking Xanax include your age, gender, ethnicity, diet, activity level, and stress levels.

If you see signs of water retention while taking Xanax, like swelling in your hands or feet, or swelling in your abdomen, talk to your doctor about it.


David Warren
Author

David Warren is a pharmaceutical specialist that dispenses prescription medication on a daily basis. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from the University of Tennessee in 1991. With over 50 publications on medication-related and pharmacy topics, David has been able to share his experiences and knowledge with others. David with lots of experience and knowledge in medications that are utilized to treat a wide range of medical conditions. Before David dispenses a medication to a patient, he will go over the side effects, dosage recommendation and contraindications.