Suboxone

Suboxone Strips – Everything You Need To Know [GUIDE] 9

There are massive amounts of individuals all around the world that have become addicted to various substances.

Opiates are undoubtedly some of the most commonly abused drugs. Breaking free of these medications is possible, but the process will not be easy.

Thankfully, some aids can make the task slightly easier. This is where Suboxone strips come into the picture. 

Within this guide, you will learn all there is to know about these strips.

What Is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication that is commonly used to combat opioid addiction. The medicine uses buprenorphine and Naloxone to help wean the user off the opiate. Although Suboxone is very similar to Subutex, it is also different since it uses two active ingredients, instead of just one. The added Naloxone can help make the medication more effective by blocking opiate medications’ effects.


What Are Suboxone Strips?

It should be known that Suboxone is available in a variety of different forms.

Although it is more frequently prescribed in pill form, the medication is also available in strips. The strips work identically to the pills, although the actual usage is slightly different. The strips contain 8mg of Suboxone and 2mg of Naloxone. This combination has been proven effective, so you can rest assured, knowing that the strips will help you break free of your opioid addiction.

How They Work

Before attempting to utilize these strips, you should take the time to figure out precisely how they work.

The strips aren’t much different from the pills and will work similarly. The medication is capable of interacting with your brain’s opiate receptors. It provides the user with the same euphoric feeling which is felt when consuming other opiates.

Of course, it doesn’t deliver the overwhelming high, which can be disorienting.

When appropriately used, the strips can eliminate your opiate cravings while alleviating the withdrawal symptoms.

The combination will allow you to withdraw from the drugs much easier and without so much pain and suffering.

Potential Adverse Effects

Before consuming any medication, even strips, you should familiarize yourself with the potential risks. Although Suboxone is generally very mild and safe, it has a few negative adverse effects.

These will be listed below for your convenience.

  • Headaches and pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Insomnia and restlessness
  • Peripheral edema

Although these effects aren’t necessarily dangerous, they can be frightening and annoying. To lower the chances of experiencing these, you should only use the strips, as instructed by your doctor. Also, be sure that you never mix the medication with others like Xanax or tramadol.

Understanding The Suboxone Strips High

Many individuals will attempt to abuse Suboxone in hopes of getting high.

Although this might seem like a good idea, it is not. Suboxone is designed to prevent the user from experiencing a high when using other opiates. Although it can provide you with mild euphoria, it will not deliver the overwhelming high associated with heroin and other harsher drugs.

With this in mind, Suboxone, whether in the pill form or strips, should not be used as a way to get high. The results will not be those that are desired.

Also, utilizing the medication with others is a mistake, as the Suboxone will void the other medications’ effects.

Opiate Blocking Properties

It should be known that Suboxone works like an opiate blocker. It blocks the brain’s opiate receptors and prevents these medications from inflicting a high on the user.

Also, the Naloxone in the drug will result in instant opiate withdrawal, when combined with other opiates. Therefore, other opiates should be avoided when utilizing Suboxone.

Overall

All in all, Suboxone is a medication that is used to combat opiate addictions. As long as you use the drug safely and do not mix it with others, it would help if you did not experience any adverse side effects.

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David Warren
David Warren is a pharmaceutical specialist that dispenses prescription medication on a daily basis. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from the University of Tennessee in 1991. With over 50 publications on medication-related and pharmacy topics, David has been able to share his experiences and knowledge with others. David with lots of experience and knowledge in medications that are utilized to treat a wide range of medical conditions. Before David dispenses a medication to a patient, he will go over the side effects, dosage recommendation and contraindications.

9 Comments

  1. suboxone is a fucking nightmare drug, they are finding out it is harder to kick than methadone. both subs and methadone are extemely hard on your liver and kidneys.i dont even know where to begin.personaly for me subs make me feel like i am underwater, drowning, it makes the acupunture points directly under my collarbone, third eye and the center of my palm way over stimulated, energy is just pouring out of them. severely thirsty but barely peeing, cant sleep, severe anxiety agitation. if taken for a month i break out in tiny zits all over face, severe pms -swelling of tits,anxiety(i spent two weeks freaking out thinking i was pregnant) it also makes cumming harder/not right.

  2. I have just recently been out in it for pain, but I believe the PM is also trying to reduce the withdrawal from the opiote meds I’ve been on, just recently Belbuca film and Nucynta……. he advised me that the Belbuca and Nucynta can’t even work together as what’s in the Belbuca blocks the Nucynta doing its job because the Belbuca in your brain what the Nucynta is supposed to do. He suggested that maybe I was just getting a placebo effect from the Nucynta but I explained I couldn’t really tell since my pain never really goes away completely and so it’s naggging effects are always there. At first visit to the new PM I was switched to T3, roboxin, something called Butatbital( for migraines and neck tension) and Nortriptyline 10mg 1-3 at bed for sleep and nerve pain. I was supposed to followed with previous PM Dr to fill my rx’s given by her one last time just in case or to be able to utilize with my new regimen rx’d by the new PM…… needless to say I missed that appt on a Monday morning after Easter because I was just wiped out! Since then I have felt like I have the flu, hot and cold, sweating and burning all over, head very fuzzy, etc. I had been using the 2 opiote meds I had left sparingly but then it occurred to me, could I possibly be going Thru withdrawal? I emailed the new Drs office right away and within 5 minutes I had them on the phone and an appt for the following Saturday! The new Dr put me on suboxene without really saying it was for withdrawal but used for pain and as a gastric bypass patient it was a good fit because I can I use it in a strip to desolve in my mouth, therefore getting into my blood stream quicker. I still after 6 years of being post op gastric bypass I still can’t get anyone to answer the ? Do these medicines metabolize and leave my body quicker than the norm and that NSAID’S are a big no no especially since I have a pretty big ulcer, yet they still suggest them for inflammation and I have to repeat myself again NO NSAID’s and then there also that anything time release or slow acting will not work for me because of yes the way I motabolize its out of my system before it can do its job. Yet they still try! Frustrating at times, it’s as if I speaking Chinese and they can’t translate! I did notice the first few days of the Suboxone I seemed to have no pain at all, or so significant significantly less that I am actually notice. Yet I’m still tired and heads still fuzzy……. am I still experiencing withdrawal or am
    I in a flare from all the changes and stress…… flares are no fun! Neither is being stuck on the medication and dr merry-go-round! Anyone else experience anything g like this? I’d love to hear it’s not just me! Lol
    Over

  3. Has anyone out there ever been put on Suboxone for pain ? My Doctor put me on it for pain and I have never had a drug addiction. Is this common ? I also noticed that my pain is still there and I feel just a little more active which seems to make me over do myself and my pain gets worse. Not sure if the suboxone is right for me . I have never been one to take pain meds. always scared of them but my pain is getting to be unbearable and the over the counter stuff just don’t work much anymore either.

  4. As Suboxone is the greatest medicine which includes the effective combination of two crucial compounds such as naloxone and buprenorphine, it gets me out from the addiction of regularly using the opioid pain killer drug. This opioid partial agonists drug provided me an amazing result with the complete relieves from the symptoms of the opiate withdrawal. As the buprenorphine ingredient is the narcotic and powerful substance, it completely avoids the addiction of using the different opioids such as hydrocodone, heroin and more.

  5. Recently, one of my family members suggested me to use the Suboxone drug in order to get rid of my opioid addiction. I have done a lot of researches on this drug before going to use it and I have found that it has two effective ingredients called naloxone and buprenorphine which are the main reasons for its extraordinary addiction recovery results. I was really amazed with its agonist activity and effective results at last.

  6. I usually got chronic leg pains and I used one famous opioid drug as the pain killer. First, I was using it just for reducing my pain and later it has become an addiction to me. My physician suggested me to make use of the Suboxone drug to treat this opioid pain killer addiction.

  7. I thank my father who told me about the Suboxone medicine which is currently the hot and widely used drug for treating the narcotic addiction. I usually have a habit of using the narcotic pain killers and finally I had faced a lot of health problems including heart attack. My father recommended using the Suboxone drug as per the prescription and direction of his physician. Now, I’m really happy with my healthy lifestyle.

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Suboxone And Xanax – Understanding The Consequences [SIMPLE ANSWERS] 3

If you are currently taking Suboxone, you should never self-medicate with Xanax.

Many hardcore drug users will tend to mix opiates and benzodiazepines, so they can achieve a bigger “high”.

It is crucial to never mix these very powerful medications because it is very risky behavior.


Harmful Side Effects

Suboxone taken alone, without the interference of other drugs can cause innumerable side effects.

Most of these side effects are harmless, but if you choose to mix it with Xanax, the side effects can become very severe.

  • Dry cough
  • Flushed face or generalized heat sensation
  • Fever/chills
  • Vertigo (dizziness)
  • Faintness
  • Headache
  • Increase perspiration
  • Difficulty urination
  • Lower or flank pain
  • Drowsiness

A benzodiazepine such as Xanax also causes a wide range of side effects including drowsiness, dry oral and nasal cavities, decreased appetite, and alterations in the menstrual cycle.

Increased Effects

Suboxone is prescribed to treat opiate addiction and to combat the horrendous withdrawal symptoms, but some individuals will misuse the drug.

Not only will they alter the dose, by increasing it or crushing the tablet, but they will tend to mix it with other highly addictive drugs.

This not only increases the euphoria and side effects, but it also increases the risk of respiratory suppression, cardiac failure, and death.

Conclusion

If you are being treated with a Suboxone maintenance dose, you should never add any type of drug to your daily regimen.

Speak with your pharmacist or primary care physician, before taking Xanax. While Xanax is highly effective in treating panic and anxiety disorders, your physician may want to prescribe you anti-anxiety medication that is not contraindicated with Suboxone.

Suboxone Taper Technique – Withdrawing Easily [GUIDE] 4

If you are currently taking Suboxone to battle opioid addiction, there will come a time when you need to taper off the drug.

It will be almost impossible to stop taking the medication all at once. Taper means to reduce your tolerance level gradually, so you do not experience any withdrawal symptoms.

You will take less and less of the drug over a certain period, but how will you go about doing that?

Below you will learn more information about tapering off Suboxone.

Are You Ready


Tapering should only be considered once you have completed a successful treatment period. Before you decide to go down this road, you need to ask yourself if you are ready for this process.

Have you made any significant changes in your life other than trying to kick opioids?

Can you deal with the stress, anxiety, and depression without turning back to those drugs?

The whole point of taking Suboxone is to drown out your cravings and withdrawals so that you can make changes in your life. If you try to taper too soon, you will likely relapse and be back where you started.


General Rule of Tapering

You will have to judge the tolerance level based on how your body physically reacts to medication decrease.

However, the general rule of thumb is to decrease your dosage by 25% every ten days. This has proven to be an effective process for many, but your body may react differently. Do not get discouraged if this does not work for you. Try tapering with a higher dosage.

How To Get Off Suboxone [QUICK GUIDE] 3

If you’ve become addicted to drugs, you might be able to use Suboxone to help you reclaim your life.

Of course, you should know that Suboxone isn’t necessarily safe and you won’t want to use it regularly or for a lengthy period of time.

With this in mind, it is absolutely imperative to learn how to get off Suboxone.

This information will be provided to you below.


Slowly Tapering Off Of The Drug

When it comes down to it, there are various ways to get off of Suboxone, but some are safer than others.

First and foremost, you should know that ceasing use quickly is not recommended. This will result in quick withdrawal symptoms, which are much more impactful. Instead, you will want to consider tapering off of the drug slowly. Over a period of weeks, if not months, you should slowly cut down on your dosage.

Eventually, you will be able to put a halt to usage completely. Following the tapering down method can potentially help you avoid all negative withdrawal symptoms.

Understanding the Withdrawal Symptoms

If you’re interested in learning how to get off Suboxone, you should also take the time to learn about the drug’s withdrawal symptoms. The medication can result in psychological, physical and behavior symptoms.

For your consideration, these symptoms will be listed below.

  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety and fear
  • Sneezing and runny nose
  • Shivering, sweating or tremors
  • Insomnia
  • An intense craving for opiates
  • Hallucinations

The majority of these symptoms can be avoided, by slowly breaking away from the drug over a period of time.

Afterword

Overall, Suboxone can be a moderately safe medication. It is also known to be entirely effective for helping consumers overcome addiction.

Just make sure that you’re prepared to withdraw from Suboxone at some time in the future.

Tramadol And Suboxone – Understanding The Consequences [SIMPLE ANSWERS] 3

Are you a user of Tramadol or Suboxone? 

If you are, you should take the time to learn about the potential interactions of these medications.

How will they behave when utilized together?

Within this guide, you will learn the overall reaction of both drugs when used simultaneously.

Tramadol Side Effects


To understand the results of using Tramadol and Suboxone, it is vital to learn about Tramadol’s side effects. These will be listed below for your convenience.

  • Headache
  • Anxiousness and nervousness
  • Itching and sweating
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness

These symptoms are generally infrequent unless you consume large doses of the medication.


When Consumed With Suboxone

Suboxone isn’t a typical medication. When consuming Suboxone it will completely nullify the effects of Tramadol.

Consuming larger quantities of Tramadol will not work either.

Instead, you will need to refrain from Suboxone use for several days, before resuming Tramadol’s use, to experience the effects of the drug. Therefore, they’re safe to use together, but pointless in theory.

Overall

When it comes down to it, you shouldn’t consume Tramadol and Suboxone together.

The results will not be pleasurable and will likely not even be felt at all. In the end, using the medications together is a waste of time and money.

Subutex VS Suboxone – Exploring The Differences [QUICK OVERVIEW] 3

Many unfortunate individuals have become addicted to opiates and other medications.

Although it is possible to wean yourself from these drugs naturally, utilizing an aid, such as Suboxone or Subutex, can help.

The United States’ Food and Drug Administration has approved both drugs and acknowledges them as helpful for withdrawing from opiates.

Although both drugs are very similar, they’re also unique in several ways. The similarities and differentials will be explored in greater depth below.


Subutex VS Suboxone Similarities

When exploring these drugs, you will find that they both share the same active ingredient, buprenorphine.

This specific chemical behaves like an opiate, but it doesn’t cause the disorienting high common with dangerous opiates like oxycodone and heroin. Both medications will satisfy your opioid receptors and prevent you from feeling sick during the withdrawal process.

The Difference

Although the medications work similarly, they have one significant difference.

Suboxone contains one additional active ingredient, naloxone. This specific chemical is added to the equation as a way to prevent abusers from misusing the drug. If you were to consume a sufficient amount of heroin and then ingest naloxone, you would immediately experience opiate withdrawal.

Since Suboxone has this added precaution, doctors are much more likely to prescribe it instead of Subutex, which is easier to abuse.

The End Result

When it comes down to it, both medications can be beneficial in opiate addiction treatment.

As long as you use the medication, as intended, it will help you break free of your opiate addiction and will not result in any negative side effects.

Suboxone And Pregnancy – Understanding The Consequences [SIMPLE ANSWERS] 5

If you are currently taking a regimented dose of Suboxone and become pregnant, you should immediately alert your clinician or primary care physician.

Of course, this professional will have to weigh the options of whether or not to wean you off of the drug, but many factors must be considered beforehand.

Below you will learn about the dangers of Suboxone pregnancy.


Scientific Studies

Many animal scientific studies completed revealed that Suboxone fetotoxicity is a potential problem, which can lead to fetal death. Congenital disabilities and malformations have also been linked to this opioid, which is why it is essential that a group of professionals thoroughly monitors you.

If the benefits outweigh the risks, your physician will determine that your best option is to remain on the Suboxone therapy. Physical heroin dependence can be challenging for any addict because the urges to use again are incredibly high.

The physician will most likely decide that you and the unborn fetus will be at a lower risk when taking Suboxone versus using heroin.

In this case, you will need to follow the strict guidelines of Suboxone treatment and never alter your maintenance dose.

Obstetrics Monitoring

Your OB/GYN will need to monitor the fetus throughout your pregnancy. Severe signs of fetal distress include:

  • Apnea (periods of breathing suspension)
  • Decreased heart rate
  • Neonatal agitation or tremors

These are severe signs that may represent that the fetus is in distress.

Since Suboxone is capable of passing from the mother to the fetus through the placenta, there is a very high risk of neonatal dependence.